Nissan to Develop New GT-R NISMO GT3 for 2018

Photo: Nissan

Photo: Nissan

Nissan has revealed that it will develop a new GT-R NISMO GT3 car, with the target of racing full-time in 2018.

The Japanese manufacturer, which has been a stalwart of GT3 competition with its current GT-R, is set to give the car a significant overhaul, although still based on the current R35 production model.

“You can expect to see a new state-of-the-art, highly competitive machine that will ensure customers continue to choose the GT-R from amongst the increasingly large variety of European manufacturers and other rival companies’ GT3 vehicles,” said NISMO President and CEO Takao Katagiri.

Masataka Yanagida and Michael Krumm will serve as development drivers, with testing carried out in both Japan and Europe.

No word has been given if the car could see an end-of-year debut, potentially after the FIA’s mandatory Balance of Performance tests for any new car models, which generally occurs in September.

4 Comments

  1. jCage

    February 17, 2017 at 2:55 pm

    “…although still based on the current R35 production model.”

    I guess that means it’s another update and not a brand new car. It’s also interesting that Yanagida is the test driver considering his move from a factory Nissan GT500 to a customer Audi GT300 drive for this season.

  2. Edgar Sanchez

    February 17, 2017 at 4:51 pm

    They should pull a BMW and develop a GTLM version while theyre at it. Better yet a full GTE car would be awesome. But only iin dreams….

  3. av

    February 18, 2017 at 3:00 pm

    A would suggest a brand new car.

  4. StueyB83

    February 19, 2017 at 5:58 pm

    Apparently, the next GT-R road car (~R36) is due around 2020, so this newer GT3 car is expected to have a 3 year tenure.

    My guess is that Nissan will heavily revise the current model GT3 car to exploit many of the newer regulations of 2016.

    The key parts (Chassis, Engine) are already well developed for purpose so it will likely be a focus on chassis dynamics and better aerodynamics, fully incorporating the new safety requirements and a little bit of engine work for durability/response.

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