Nissan Onroak DPi Debuts New Electronics Package

Photo: Mike Levitt/IMSA

Onroak Automotive has made the switch from Cosworth to Motec electronics for its Nissan Onroak DPi, in a move aimed to improve the car’s reliability for the remainder of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship season.

The French constructor has debuted the new electronic package for the GT3-based 3.8-lite twin-turbo V6 powerplant this weekend at Road America, after completing IMSA’s re-certification process for permitted DPi updates since the last Prototype race at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park last month.

The process, which included dyno testing at NASCAR’s R&D center in Concord, N.C., has resulted in a more refined overall package, according to Onroak North America Market Manager Ethan Bregman.

“It’s reliability,” Bregman told Sportscar365. “I don’t see the performance of the car changing but I see our ability to get data and information out of the car better for the ESM and also the ability to handle reliability systems on the engine and the complexity of the car will be much more uniform.”

Tequila Patron ESM rolled out with the new IMSA-approved updates in a two-day test at Palm Beach International Raceway last week, in what team owner/driver Scott Sharp said has been a positive step forward for the car.

“One of the things we tested was a switch to the Motec system,” Sharp said. “There have been some reliability issues the team has been dealing with all year. We hope a switch to the Motec system gets those under control.”

It’s understood the changes made by Onroak are permitted under IMSA’s DPi regulations and does not factor into the draft homologation provisions currently permitted for all DPi manufacturers this year.

DPi manufacturers are allowed to roll out with various aero and engine-related updates to their cars on an unlimited basis, under IMSA’s certification process that includes wind tunnel and/or dyno testing. 

The changes are not aimed for performance gains but rather to improve reliability and update branding and potential styling changes to the bodywork.

11 Comments

  1. JC

    August 4, 2017 at 5:41 pm

    But did they also get a Motec System Exhaust?

    • Nate B

      August 4, 2017 at 11:31 pm

      1,000,000 bonus points.

  2. Guest

    August 4, 2017 at 6:06 pm

    I wonder what the GT-R GT3 uses.

  3. Dan

    August 4, 2017 at 8:50 pm

    “DPi manufacturers are allowed to roll out with various aero and engine-related updates to their cars on an unlimited basis, under IMSA’s certification process that includes wind tunnel and/or dyno testing.

    The changes are not aimed for performance gains but rather to improve reliability and update branding and potential styling changes to the bodywork.”

    Well if that’s not a contradiction in the rules. If you make changed to aero and engine then you are affecting the performance. Hello spending contest.

    • John Dagys

      August 4, 2017 at 10:54 pm

      Everything is BoP’ed — hence the reason they need to go back into the wind tunnel and/or on the dyno. So any of these updates will not result in improved performance.

    • Guest

      August 5, 2017 at 4:36 am

      Pretty sure they have to homoligate everything this weekend. That’s why Mazda pulled out, so they didn’t have to homoligate their disaster of a car.

      Not sure what will be allowed going forward, but nothing huge most likely. Probably just software, or a few approved hard parts if they can prove to IMSA they’re about reliability. ESM better hope these new electronics solve their problems.

    • Slicks in the wet

      August 5, 2017 at 6:15 am

      The idea is to say change crappy suspension components that snap every week. Sure, yeah, improving reliability opens the door for nudge nudge wink wink performance gains by getting really great suspension thrown in…but..I read it as “hey guys, let’s follow the spirit of the law here..you start abusing it and we’ll crack down.”

      If Mazda comes out with a great car that trounces all..they’ll lose aero or boost in BOP. It’ll still be better cause they can fight for wins and finish a race..but there isn’t much incentive for Joest to make the RT24-P into an R10 clone, cause, it’s gonna be pegged back to a fast LMP2 anyway.

      Cadillac has shown its better to aim for the stars and hit the moon when it comes to total possible performance. As nothing on the car is being asked to give 100%. That creates reliability.

  4. SIZZLE SPECKY

    August 5, 2017 at 9:02 am

    Strange how electronics makes the headlines, oh wait, John is best friends with the electronics engineer on ESM, and he is a Motec dealer, and so this is great promotion, he gets to slam the competition, and make some margin on the new kit. The other kit seems to be doing well on the GM DPI cars and the rest of the P2 cars, won all the races so far. No electronics based retirements at Le Mans for the P2 class, what have ESM be going wrong with the same kit?

    • Slicks in the wet

      August 5, 2017 at 12:33 pm

      Don’t follow the money trail of charities on the cars either, if this kinda rub my back I’ll rub yours, makes you mad. Lol.

    • Michael

      August 6, 2017 at 8:01 am

      I know that guy. He’s worked with cosworth for years in IndyCar, like more than 15. I’d think he knows more about pi han the cosworth kids floating around the paddock so if anyone could make it work he could have. I think Dags have reported on the electronics before because of all the problems at Daytona so maybe it’s more of a follow up article than a money thing. Either way it’s a large investment in time and money to make a switch like that.

    • Pushrods are for Winners

      August 7, 2017 at 10:51 pm

      SIZZLE SPECKY – Cadillac DPi cars do not use a Cosworth system for engine control. They use Bosch. Cosworth components are in the car but the engine ECU is Bosch.

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