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Porsche Unveils New 911 GT3 R

Porsche takes wraps off new 911 GT3 R, set for 2019 customer racing debut…

Photo: John Dagys

Porsche has taken the wraps off the new 911 GT3 R, which will make its full customer racing debut in 2019.

The unveiling came Friday morning at the Nürburgring, site of this weekend’s German endurance classic.

Porsche’s latest FIA GT3-spec contender, based on the 911 GT3 RS, features a rear-mounted normally aspirated engine, with a focus on improved aerodynamics, optimized safety and reduced servicing and rebuild costs.

The 4.0-liter flat-six powerplant, producing an estimated 550 horsepower, is nearly identical to its road-legal counterpart, which recently lapped the Nürburgring in a sub-seven minute time from factory driver Kevin Estre.

In addition to optimized lightweight components, including a carbon fiber hood, wheel arches, doors, side and rear tail sections, the new-gen Porsche features increased frontal downforce through new wheel arch air vents and front fairings. 

The car also features a double-wishbone suspension in the front, which has allowed Porsche to utilize the maximum-permitted front wheel and tire size for the first time.

A new brake system has been developed, with further modifications to offer increased stiffness and more precise control of the ABS system, along with the introduction of a fully automatic clutch.

Aero developments have also been made in the rear, with a more defined diffuser.

Other enhancements include a fuel cell that can be filled from either the left or right sides, depending on the circuit layout, and additional safety features in the newly redesigned cockpit.

It includes a fixed-position seat, added side-impact panels and, for the first time in a GT3-spec Porsche, an air conditioning system.

An extensive testing and development program is already underway for the new car, which was recently spotted at Monza, with further tests planned in the run up to the FIA’s Balance of Performance test and final homologation.

The new car, with a price tag of €459,000 ($546,000), plus taxes, can be ordered immediately, with the first customer delivers set to begin in December.

While poised to make its competition debut in end-of-year endurance races, the new 911 GT3 R’s global customer launch is expected to come at next year’s Rolex 24 at Daytona.

Photo: Porsche

Photo: Porsche

Photo: Porsche

Photo: Porsche

John Dagys is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Sportscar365 as well as the recently launched e-racing365 Web site for electric racing. Dagys spent eight years as a motorsports correspondent for FOXSports.com/SPEED Channel, and contributes to other publications worldwide. Contact John

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Michael Sørensen

    May 11, 2018 at 5:03 am

    Can live with that 🙂

  2. vinay mistry

    May 11, 2018 at 5:20 am

    Man I really am loving these new gen Gt3 cars. They all look so aggressive. Not only this its the same with GTE as well these cars are getting up there with the GT2 and GT1s in terms of aggressiveness

    • A sera

      May 11, 2018 at 7:17 pm

      What’s up with Gt2 track car at Monday? Sounded like a modern day 934, 935.

  3. Prototype 1

    May 11, 2018 at 5:53 am

    Wow, liking this one.
    Wonder if it will join the new Aston Martin Vantage GT3 in the VLN at the end of the year. Or, will it go straight to the GT Daytona next year.

  4. Porch? Porker? Idk

    May 11, 2018 at 7:01 am

    911 RSR mirrors

  5. Jadon

    May 11, 2018 at 7:16 am

    I like the livery would be cool if’s some customers retain it.

  6. 4644389876

    May 11, 2018 at 8:01 am

    Why so serious? The old 991 GT3-R was just a pure, happy bundle of joy. The face on this one is just disdain.

    • A sera

      May 11, 2018 at 7:03 pm

      Why not?

  7. Just a guy

    May 11, 2018 at 1:13 pm

    Nice to see they put a proper floor mounted pedal box. That is one thing the current spec was needing!!

  8. A sera

    May 11, 2018 at 7:13 pm

    Porsche again thinking outside the box, improving handling and braking making it
    difficult for Bop to detune.

    • ortho

      May 12, 2018 at 8:52 am

      Add weight – easy to penalize for BOP.

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